Passive and Active Anger

Everyone feels their anger is justified when they're actually angry. Equally, we've all looked back and realised we may have overreacted. But for some people, anger can become a problem that needs to be addressed.

Anger is an emotion related to one's psychological interpretation of having been offended, wronged or denied and a tendency to undo that by retaliation. Anger is also a mixture of both emotional and physical changes. A big surge of energy goes through your body as chemicals, such as adrenaline, are released. 

Now here are Passive and Active anger symptoms:

# Passive Anger #
Dispassion, such as giving the cold shoulder or phony smiles, looking unconcerned, sitting on the fence while others sort things out, not responding to another's anger, frigidity, talking of frustrations but showing no feeling. 
Evasiveness, such as turning your back in a crisis, avoiding conflict, not arguing back, becoming phobic.
Ineffectualness, such as setting yourself and others up for failure, choosing unreliable people to depend on, being accident prone, expressing frustration at insignificant things but ignoring serious ones.
Obsessive behavior, such as needing to be inordinately clean and tidy, making a habit of constantly checking things, over-dieting or overeating, demanding that all jobs be done perfectly.
Self blame
, such as apologizing too often, being overly critical, inviting criticism.
Self sacrifice
, such as being overly helpful, making do with second best, quietly making long-suffering signs but refusing help, or lapping up gratefulness.
Psychological manipulation, such as provoking people to aggression and then patronizing them, false tearfulness, feigning illness, sabotaging relationships, using sexual provocation, using a third party to convey negative feelings.

# Active Anger #
Bullying, such as threatening people directly, persecuting, pushing or shoving, using power to oppress, shouting, driving someone off the road, playing on people's weaknesses.
Destructiveness, such as destroying objects, harming animals, destroying a relationship, reckless driving, substance abuse.
Grandiosity, such as showing off, expressing mistrust, not delegating, being a sore loser, wanting center stage all the time, not listening, talking over people's heads, expecting kiss and make-up sessions to solve problems.
Hurtfulness, such as physical violence, verbal abuse, biased or vulgar jokes, breaking a confidence, using foul language, ignoring people's feelings, willfully discriminating, blaming, punishing people for unwarranted deeds, labeling others.
Unjust blaming, such as accusing other people for your own mistakes, blaming people for your own feelings, making general accusations.
Vengeance, such as being over-punitive, refusing to forgive and forget, bringing up hurtful memories from the past.
Threats, such as frightening people by saying how you could harm them, their property or their prospects, finger pointing, fist shaking, wearing clothes or symbols associated with violent behavior, tailgating, excessively blowing a car horn, slamming doors.

Relaxing Tips

Relaxation is one of the most effective self-help activities for mental health. It can be a useful addition to any other form of treatment as well as being an effective measure to prevent the development of stress and anxiety.

Planned relaxation calms anxiety and helps your body and mind recover from everyday rush and stress. Music, a long soak in the bath, or a walk in the park do the trick for some people, but for others it's not so easy. 
If you feel you need help with learning to relax, try a relaxation or meditation class.

 Here's a few tips n tricks for you to relaxing:
- Choose a quiet place where you won't be interrupted.
- Before you start, do a few gentle stretching exercises to relieve muscular tension.
- Make yourself comfortable, either sitting or lying down.
- Start to breathe slowly and deeply, in a calm and effortless way.
- Gently tense, then relax, each part of your body, starting with your feet and working your way up to your face and head.
- As you focus on each area, think of warmth, heaviness and relaxation.
- Push any distracting thoughts to the back of your mind; imagine them floating away.
- Don't try to relax; simply let go of the tension in your muscles and allow them to become relaxed.
- Let your mind go empty. Some people find it helpful to visualize a calm, beautiful place such as a garden or meadow.
- Stay like this for about 20 minutes, then take some deep breaths and open your eyes, but stay sitting or lying for a few moments before you get up.

Note: body-centered exercises also have an effect on the mind. Having a relaxed body may not prevent a constant flow of anxiety-inducing thoughts but it's a good basis for getting some control of them. So for best results try to combine both body and mind relaxing techniques.